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Birding the Badlands

By admin / 27 January 2021

BY RYAN WILKES WITH HEATHER BLANCHETTE

Despite the barren landscape that is often associated with the badlands, the valley accommodates a lively riparian forest. This ecosystem makes the river valley a popular birding spot for local naturalists and visiting birders alike.

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Loon with chick

Why Are Common Loon Chicks Becoming Less Common?

By admin / 22 January 2021

BY KRISTIN BIANCHINI

Measuring loon productivity is also an excellent indicator of lake health. As top predators, loons are sensitive to damage at lower levels of the food chain. For example, processes that decrease the number of fish in a lake can cause food shortages, especially for young loons. Being a top predator also makes loons more vulnerable to pollutants, like acid rain and mercury.

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Two adult coyotes.

Keep Those Wily Urban Coyotes Wild!

By admin / 22 January 2021

BY COLLEEN CASSADY ST. CLAIR

I began studying urban coyotes a little over a decade ago because Alberta’s cities, like virtually every city in North America, have seen a steady increase in reports of urban coyotes over time.

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Eastern kingbird eating a grasshopper.

Eastern Kingbirds

By admin / 18 January 2021

BY MYRNA PEARMAN

Eastern kingbirds belong to a group of birds known as the tyrant flycatchers, and the Latin name of this species, Tyrannus tyrannus, reflects their pugnacious nature.

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Big brown bat

Bat House Monitoring at Ellis Bird Farm

By admin / 15 October 2020

BY SHAYE HILL, MYRNA PEARMAN, CLAUDIA LIPSKI, AND NATALIA LIFSHITZ

Bats are fascinating creatures, playing a critical role in supporting biodiversity.

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Alberta’s Bull Trout Need Our Respect — and Our Help

By admin / 16 August 2020

BY JENNIFER EARLE

Bull trout seem to be the Rodney Dangerfield of fish — they get no respect. They are the official provincial fish of Alberta, yet this distinction hasn’t served them particularly well. They are listed as Threatened under both provincial and federal legislation. So how did we get here?

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Fisher in a tree.

A Story of Mammals in Alberta’s Beaver Hills Biosphere Reserve

By admin / 15 January 2020

BY FRANCES STEWART

I was walking through an aspen forest in the UNESCO Beaver Hills Biosphere Reserve (BHB), 50 km east of Edmonton and south of Elk Island National Park. The first rays of sunlight were peeking through the trees and shining off the fresh snow on this crisp January morning. It was silent, still. I could see my breath shimmering in front of me like the beautiful hoar frost on the surrounding branches. A perfect morning for live-trapping fisher.

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