The Difference YOU Make

Part of our mission is to promote the greater appreciation of Alberta’s natural environment. Your support of our outreach programs makes this mission possible. We call it #CreatingConnection.

Read some stories of the real impact your donation has had on our community.

Christmas Bird Count for Kids!

Join Nature Alberta in Calgary Dec. 17th, or Edmonton Dec. 18th for our annual Christmas Bird Count for Kids!

Families of all ages are welcome to join us to observe winter birds. We will submit our birding list to contribute to data across the province, which scientists then use to help study how bird populations are changing.

Space is limited so register today!

Get Involved with Citizen Science!

Over the past few years there has been an explosion of interest in citizen science, check out our newly updated page with everything you need to know to participate, and join one of these great upcoming events:
May Species Count, through May 29th, and BiodiverCity Challenge June 9-12.

Get out and contribute your nature observations to the growing collection of boots-on-the-ground data!

Become a Monthly Donor

Squirrelling away a little every month helps us build a bigger stash, steadily growing the Nature Alberta Endowment Fund as a sustainable source of ongoing funding.

Small monthly donations are easy on your budget, but add up to a big impact! Your contributions support our education and outreach programs through every season.

Coal Mining Update: Kicking the Can Down the Road (Again)

The Coal Policy has been reinstated, and exploration and development across the entire region covered by the policy has been halted. This is indeed good news. But don’t break out the champagne just yet; this is a temporary reprieve.

Rather than closing the door to new coal mines in the Eastern Slopes, the government is deferring decisions about future projects to a land-use planning exercise. Moreover, four mining proposals already in review are exempted from the ban on new developments.

Sustainable Forestry?

Over the past two decades, steady progress has been made in refining the principles of ecological forest management and putting the new ideas into practice. To be clear, this does not mean that all of the ideals set forth in the Forest Conservation Strategy have been achieved; indeed, many gaps remain. But we certainly have moved a long way from the days of sustained-yield harvesting.

Unfortunately, the progress we’ve made in advancing ecological forest management is now under threat.

Grow Your Legacy

Your contribution to the Nature Alberta Endowment Fund helps ensure we can continue to promote, conserve, and protect Alberta’s natural heritage for years to come, and help inspire the next generation of naturalists.

A Community Connected by a Love of Nature

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Alberta is home to incredible natural spaces comprised of beautiful and varied landscapes, and rich biodiversity reflected in our abundant and diverse flora and fauna. Across the province, natural history clubs and their members are engaging Albertans in the conservation and appreciation of this natural heritage. Nature Alberta represents a network of these natural history organizations in Alberta.

CURRENT MAGAZINE

The Fall issue of Nature Alberta Magazine is now available to read online! To receive your own copy of the Winter issue delivered to your mailbox, subscribe by December 19, 2022.

(A subscription to Nature Alberta Magazine makes a great gift for the nature lovers on your list!)

FEATURE STORY

Diminished Chorus: The Decline of Grassland Birds

BY NANCY MAHONY

Few people are lucky enough to experience the dawn chorus on Alberta’s native grasslands — a bewildering concert of ringing trills, melodious gurgles, and jumbled songs. I’ve had the good fortune to do so on many May and June mornings, as a biologist researching grassland songbirds at one of Canada’s largest remaining native prairies, the Suffield National Wildlife Area near Medicine Hat.

Nature Alberta STORE

Check our store for books and more!

Members receive 10% off all merchandise in the store. Reach out to info@naturealberta.ca for your member discount code!

News

Counting Winter Bugs with John Acorn

Nature Alberta’s Nature Network Speaker Series
Wed, Jan 11 at 7 PM

Read More

Diminished Chorus: The Decline of Grassland Birds

BY NANCY MAHONY

Few people are lucky enough to experience the dawn chorus on Alberta’s native grasslands — a bewildering concert of ringing trills, melodious gurgles, and jumbled songs. I’ve had the good fortune to do so on many May and June mornings, as a biologist researching grassland songbirds at one of Canada’s largest remaining native prairies, the Suffield National Wildlife Area near Medicine Hat.

Read More

Wild Boars on the March

Initially, wild boar numbers were low and they went largely unnoticed. However, their high reproductive rate is a recipe for exponential growth, which is exactly what has happened.

Read More

The Implications of Shifting Baselines on Nature Conservation

BY LU CARBYN

Ecosystems change over time without any tampering by humankind. Human impacts, however, have caused massive changes over a short period of time that have resulted in serious environmental concerns, including loss of biodiversity.1 We are all aware of the global issues of habitat loss and wildlife extinction around the world, which call for intervention and leadership from governments, academics, and researchers. However, we do not need to look so far as the destruction of tropical forests of Brazil or Borneo; we can see these issues right here in Alberta.

Read More

Death by “Data Deficient”: The Disappearance of Wolverines in Alberta’s Eastern Slopes

BY GILLIAN CHOW-FRASER

Olaus Murie once wrote, “I wonder if there is another inhabitant of northern wilderness that so excites the imagination.”1 The species he was referring to? None other than the wolverine.

More than 60 years later, the same thought ran through my mind as I tracked through the foothills of Alberta’s Rocky Mountains. Would this be the day? Would I be able to catch even a brief glimpse of a wolverine’s bushy tail in the distance?

Read More

Coal Mining Update: Kicking the Can Down the Road (Again)

The message from the year-long public consultation is crystal clear. Albertans do not want more coal mining in the Eastern Slopes. They want this special region to be protected. If you agree, please write to Minister Savage and urge her to take meaningful action now: minister.energy@gov.ab.ca. The government should enact legislation that provides permanent protection for all ecologically important lands within the Eastern Slopes. Kicking the can down the road is not a reasonable alternative.

Read More

Scanning for Life Forms

Using Environmental DNA to Identify Species, Science Fiction Becomes Reality
By Jay White, M.Sc., P.Biol.

Read More

Shall We Gather at the River?
Irrigation and the Future of Southern Alberta’s Rivers

BY LORNE FITCH

In the heat dome and severe low flows of 2021, our canoe left smears of colour on several barely submerged boulders of one of Alberta’s prairie rivers. These low water levels had me reflecting on the recent scheme by southern Alberta’s irrigation sector to expand irrigated acreage. I thought of the old hymn, “Shall we Gather at the River.”

Read More

Making Citizen Science Count

BY RICHARD SCHNEIDER
As naturalists, we love to watch wildlife, but if we want wild species to remain viable we need to actively contribute to their conservation.

Read More

Chinese Mystery Snails in Alberta

Non-native Chinese mystery snail (Cipangopaludina chinensis), first introduced to North America in the 1890s through food markets in San Francisco, was officially sighted in McGregor Lake Reservoir, near the village of Milo in southern Alberta in 2019.

Read More

3 days ago

Nature Alberta
How can you tell the difference between a house finch and a purple finch? These birds can often get confused for each other given the red colour that covers their feathers. But if you look closely, the house finch (first image) has some stripes along its abdomen. The purple finch doesn't, and is usually described as looking like it's been "dipped in raspberry juice". With only a few more weeks before the #ChristmasBirdCount starts, there are so many ways for you to get involved. Visit naturealberta.ca/christmas-bird-count/ to join a count, or email naturekids@naturealberta.ca to learn how you can get involved as a family! And of course, visit us on YouTube (@naturealberta) for recorded presentations that will help you build your birding skills. 📸 Gerald Romanchuk#Chirstmas #Birds #BirdPhotography #Nature #Winter #CitizenScience #Alberta ... See MoreSee Less
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4 days ago

Nature Alberta
Do you have a special nature lover on your #Christmas list? Our online store has dozens of amazing items to help people of all ages connect with nature. From exciting Nature Kid binoculars to ideas on how to transform your backyard into a native species oasis, there's something for every interest!Visit nature-alberta.square.site/ to shop our entire selection.#Christmas #Holidays #winter #gifts #SpecialSomeone #nature #childhoodunplugged #books ... See MoreSee Less
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1 week ago

Nature Alberta
With the holidays fast approaching, this time of year is busy for many. Connecting with nature can help alleviate stress, decrease blood pressure and improve mood. Bird watching in particular can have amazing effects, as Chris Fisher explores in his upcoming talk with the Helen Schuler Nature Centre.Visit naturealberta.ca/travel-adventures-by-fhsncs-dec/ to learn all about how birds can be prescriptions for happiness.#birds #nature #winter #chirstmas #Holidays #health #getoutside ... See MoreSee Less
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1 week ago

Nature Alberta
What's your favourite nature memory from growing up? Studies have shown that playing outdoors and experiencing nature are critical parts of their social, psychological, mental, and physical health. And yet, fewer kids than ever before are building these connections. The Helen Schuler Nature Centre is tackling this problem head-on. From crafting programs to their Junior Naturalists Open house, they've got lots on the go this week! Visit naturealberta.ca/hsnc-family-programs-nov-dec-2022/ for all the details.#lethbridge #lethbridgemoms #nature #childhoodunplugged #family #kidsneednature #winter2022 ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Nature Alberta
While we usually think of #CitizenScience as a fairly new creation, some projects have been going on for over 100 years! Take the #ChristmasBirdCount for example. Since 1900 people have been getting together annually to record the birds they see and help scientists learn about our feathered winter neighbors. You can join this time-honored tradition too! From Bush Beaters to Feeder Watchers there are plenty of opportunities for every interest. Visit naturealberta.ca/christmas-bird-count/ for all the details.#birds #birdphotography #winter #alberta ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Nature Alberta
Hey #NatureKids, how do squirrels survive the winter? They can't migrate like birds or hibernate like bats. And unlike you, they can't go out to the store and buy a big warm coat. So what do they do instead? We'll give you a hint: it involves a very warm hiding spot and lots of food.Learn exactly how squirrels survive at naturealberta.ca/do-red-squirrels-hibernate/#NatureHood #naturehoodab #kids #neverstoplearning #squirrels #winter #cold ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Nature Alberta
What does community mean to you? For us, it's about sharing our love for nature, growing together, and helping keep our wild spaces safe. By signing up as a member you can join our mission to support the appreciation and conservation of Alberta’s natural environment. It also allows you to access special E-news updates and gets you 10% off books and merchandise in our online store. The bestpart? All memberships are lifetime memberships, meaning you’ll never have to renew!Visit naturealberta.ca/membership/ and learnhow to get started.📸Steph Weizenbach#Conservation #Community #Memberships #Nature ... See MoreSee Less
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NATURE ALBERTA

email: info@naturealberta.ca

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