Birds

Bird-Oriented Nature Clubs

External Resources

Nature Alberta Publications

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Alberta Birds Checklist

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A Homeowner’s Guide to Protecting Birds of Alberta

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Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas of Alberta

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Field Guide to Alberta Birds

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The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Alberta

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The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Alberta: A Second Look

Recent Articles

Spotted Sandpiper standing over the water
Spotted Sandpiper by Myrna Pearman

Spotting Spotted Sandpipers

2 November 2021

BY MYRNA PEARMAN

As I approached the west shoreline, I noticed a pair of spotted sandpipers bobbing along a small stretch of beach. As I paddled closer, two little fluffballs suddenly materialized!

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Saw-whet Owl

Beaverhill Bird Observatory BirdSmart Program

2 August 2021

The Beaverhill Bird Observatory offers an exciting education outreach program called BirdSmart! Learn more here!

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Winter Birdwatching Scavenger Hunt

8 February 2021

Kids can have fun bird watching too! These activity sheets have been created with junior bird watchers in mind, so get out and get observing. How many of our feathered friends can you find?

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A Harlan’s hawk soaring straight overhead of the surveyors at Orkney Viewpoint. RYAN WILKES

Birding the Badlands

27 January 2021

BY RYAN WILKES WITH HEATHER BLANCHETTE

Despite the barren landscape that is often associated with the badlands, the valley accommodates a lively riparian forest. This ecosystem makes the river valley a popular birding spot for local naturalists and visiting birders alike.

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Loon with chick
Common loon adult with small chick. DARWIN PARK

Why Are Common Loon Chicks Becoming Less Common?

22 January 2021

BY KRISTIN BIANCHINI

Measuring loon productivity is also an excellent indicator of lake health. As top predators, loons are sensitive to damage at lower levels of the food chain. For example, processes that decrease the number of fish in a lake can cause food shortages, especially for young loons. Being a top predator also makes loons more vulnerable to pollutants, like acid rain and mercury.

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