Posts

Why are bluebirds blue?

By Steph Weizenbach / 1 August 2022

The blue feathers of a bluebird are blue for a special reason!

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What is a cavity-nesting bird?

By Steph Weizenbach / 1 August 2022

Many birds make open cup nests while other birds nest in cavities. Not the same cavity as in your teeth!

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Weathering Winter with Chickadees

By Steph Weizenbach / 28 January 2022

Alberta is home to four chickadee species. Black-capped chickadees are the most common and widespread. They are found across the entire province and are not only the easiest bird species to attract to backyard bird feeders, but also hold the distinction of being Canada’s most common feeder species. Their small size, cheery countenance, and remarkable hardiness endear them to their human neighbours.

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Spotted Sandpiper standing over the water

Spotting Spotted Sandpipers

By Steph Weizenbach / 2 November 2021

BY MYRNA PEARMAN

As I approached the west shoreline, I noticed a pair of spotted sandpipers bobbing along a small stretch of beach. As I paddled closer, two little fluffballs suddenly materialized!

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Eastern kingbird eating a grasshopper.

Eastern Kingbirds

By Susan / 18 January 2021

BY MYRNA PEARMAN

Eastern kingbirds belong to a group of birds known as the tyrant flycatchers, and the Latin name of this species, Tyrannus tyrannus, reflects their pugnacious nature.

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Big brown bat

Bat House Monitoring at Ellis Bird Farm

By Susan / 15 October 2020

BY SHAYE HILL, MYRNA PEARMAN, CLAUDIA LIPSKI, AND NATALIA LIFSHITZ

Bats are fascinating creatures, playing a critical role in supporting biodiversity.

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Rabbits and Hares

By Susan / 16 August 2020

BY MYRNA PEARMAN

It has been my good fortune to have spent, over the past few years, some quality time in the company of each of Alberta’s three native “bunny” species. All three species — which include two hares and one rabbit — have adapted well to human habitation, taking up residence in farmyards, towns, and cities across the province.

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Bohemian Waxwings

By Susan / 15 January 2020

BY MYRNA PEARMAN

It is always a treat when a winter flock of Bohemian Waxwings suddenly descends on the cotoneaster bushes in our yard. No matter the weather, their constant trilling fills the air and they devour the berries with great flourish. Although always in constant motion, they usually allow close approach – a photographer’s delight!

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